Designing for Dementia (and ALL)

I’m far from a UX expert, but I am learning more and more all the time, thanks in large part to working with Aaron Schmidt over the past year.  Here’s the thing about UX – once you know it, you can’t unknow it.  Once you see it one place, you see it in all the places. Like Mojo Nixon once said of Elvis, “UX is everywhere, man.”

Here’s a recent example:

This week, staff at Chapel Hill Public Library have had training sessions on how to best serve users facing dementia.  Sponsored by Dementia Friendly Orange County, a non-profit whose goal is “to raise awareness and make life better for people with dementia and those who care for them.”  Their new initiative is to train local businesses and organizations about ways to recognize and serve people facing dementia, leading to a “Dementia-Friendly Business” certification.

To help staff understand what’s going on with users facing dementia, the quote that was repeated throughout the session was “They aren’t giving you a hard time.  They are having a hard time.” The trainers stressed that if you find yourself interacting with a user who is facing dementia, remember this to help you empathize, strategize, and ultimately help them.

 

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As soon as I heard this statement, I thought, “If you find yourself interacting with ANY user, remember this to help you empathize, strategize, and ultimately help them.”

Sure, there are a few folks out there whose sole purpose is to give you a hard time.  I’d argue that they are rare.  Most people want to have a successful outcome and genuinely accept help, but they are often having a hard time.  As I’ve learned through working with Mr. Schmidt and garnering some basic UX skills, that hard time is often caused by policies, procedures, places, and spaces that were not designed with the user in mind.

Here are a few more slides from the training about working with folks facing dementia.  I think these are good ideas for working with all the folks:

dementia one

Patience, respect, and dignity for all.  Simplicity in interactions and information.  Yes, please.

dementia two

Helpful attitudes, easy signs, and simple options.  Sign me up.

Picture1

 

Use jargon-free communication?  Monitor body language and tone of voice?  Be patient and flexible?  Let’s do that with all the people, okay?

You can find the training video here and more about the Dementia Friendly Movement here.

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