Because of UX… (Part 1)

At Chapel Hill Public Library, we had the great good fortune to spend the past 12 months working with Aaron Schmidt on a library-wide UX assessment and improvement project. The project was possible by the State Library of North Carolina, through an LSTA grant.

It was an AMAZING year for me, for CHPL staff, and for our users.  I began the year as an UX noob and a year later, I am far from an UX expert.  But I have learned and grown – professionally and personally – and will continue to do so.

I’ll admit, I wrote the grant as a means to an end – I wanted a new website and a new floor plan for the library, as both were far from optimal experiences for our users.  UX was the way to get there and Aaron Schmidt was the ringer we brought in to get it done.

However, soon after reading his book, meeting him, and delving into the work, I realized that UX was WAY more than a means to an end – it’s the way we ought to do business. Not just CHPL.  Not just public libraries.  All the libraries in all the places should embrace, understand, and utilize UX as part of their core business model.

Why?  There are lots of good reasons, but for me, the biggest one is that libraries are for people.  As I’ve often said…

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UX helps libraries of all types remember what’s most important – the people that use us.  The people that sometimes struggle to use us.  The people that often use us and seldom use us.  The power patrons and the noobs. The people that love us and those that don’t –yet. The people that want to achieve something great – or just complete a simple task.  As I’ve often said…

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So, I encourage librarians everywhere to learn more about UX.  Here’s how I’ve grown and improved myself and a little of what I’ve learned and been reminded of.

Because of UX…

I’m still processing and practicing and reflecting on all of the UX things I’ve learned, I’ll pull them together for Part 2 next week.

Are you new to UX?  Are you an expert?  What have you learned and how have you changed because of UX?

 

#TBT – Going Rogue for Summer Reading

In honor of the season and the day, I am reposting an article I wrote for Novelist a few years ago for this early summer edition of Throwback Thursday.  At the time, this felt like edgy stuff – ditching the CSLP theme felt like a crazy move!  However, based on responses to the piece, I learned that many other libraries were also (and were already) rethinking summer reading.

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Fast forward to 2016 and libraries are still doing just that – rethinking, reframing, and redesigning summer reading programs to create more value, reach more people, and have a greater impact.  Inspired by what many other libraries are doing, Chapel Hill Public Library is embracing the summer challenge framework and expanding the scope beyond just reading to embrace experiential learning as well.

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Charlotte Mecklenburg’s Summer Break Program 
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Chicago Public Library’s Summer Learning Challenge

As I post this, and thanks to our fabulous Youth, RA, and Marketing staff, we are launching our 2016 Summer Challenge: Read More, Do More, Learn More – I’ll let you know how it goes.

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Raise your hand (and comment below) if you and your library are rethinking the season and your approach to it.  I’d love to hear about what you are doing!

Going Rogue for Summer Reading: A Totally Local Approach to our Busiest Season

Originally appeared in the October 2013 issue of Kids & Books

It all started in the fall of 2011. After another summer — our busiest season at Lawrence Public Library — staff from Children’s, Teen, and Adult departments gathered to discuss how the summer reading program went. Good participation numbers? Check! Engaging slate of programs? Check! Lots of happy readers? Check!

But there was an elephant in the room. As the newly appointed Marketing Director, I waited for someone else to say it. I knew they were thinking it. Finally, someone made the comment that started a deeper conversation. A conversation that eventually led to us “going rogue” for summer reading. A member of the adult services staff said, “I just wish the swag bags had our name on them. I see people carrying these cute cloth bags all over town, which is great. But you can’t tell that people got these bags from us, which isn’t so great.”

This comment led to a weeks-long discussion about the marketing and promotional piece of summer reading. For years, like many libraries, we bought into the CSLP — the Cooperative Summer Library Program. We liked how everything was pre-fabricated. The theme for the year was done, all of the graphics provided, and all of the incentives ready to hand out. But this was also exactly what we didn’t like about it. We were trying to figure out ways to make our marketing and branding what I termed “hyper-local.” The way we’d approached summer reading was easy, and the themes were good, but they did not speak to our community. We decided to re-think summer reading from top to bottom. The result: a totally local summer reading program that looks great, is easy to engage with, and is more successful than ever.  Read the full article here.

Public Libraries, Local Government, and Value

“Libraries exist as parts of larger systems. Public libraries are part of cities, towns, and counties… Almost no library stands alone. These larger host systems created the libraries, and they sustain them. Libraries rise and fall as their host systems rise and fall.”

-Eleanor Jo Rodger, “What’s A Library Worth?”

It is a truth universally acknowledged that libraries must go beyond talking about their stuff and counting their circulation.  In order to survive, libraries must communicate their value and measure their impact.  In order to thrive, libraries must align themselves with the goals of the community they serve and help realize those goals, hopes, and aspirations.

Lots of libraries are doing this for their communities.  As Eleanor Jo Rodger put it in her outstanding article on the subject, these libraries understand the host ecosystem they serve and are contributing to its survival and success.  But our external community is only one ecosystem we exist within.  Public libraries hold a great deal of value for the internal community we serve as well.

Whatever our governing structure – municipal, county, regional, quasi-governmental – public libraries are generally a part of local government.  Local government is an ecosystem-within-an-ecosystem with its own goals, hopes, and aspirations.  Whether we are tightly knit to that system (like a municipal library) or a little further removed (like a regional library system), we can do for these ecosystems what we do for our communities at large – communicate our value, align ourselves with them, and contribute to their goals and aspirations.

Here are a few practical ways public libraries might do so:

Training Initiatives – Is your city/county placing an emphasis on training and development? Are they looking for cost effective ways to provide more training? You might send information about the Library’s computer classes to employees – or host a special class just for them.  If you have resources like Lynda.com, you might send staff out to different departments to show supervisors and training coordinators how they can use it in their training programs.

Tech Initiatives – Is your city/county talking about revamping its website?  Maybe a device loan program for employees?  You might offer a staff member to serve on the web development team – or offer the library as a spot for usability testing before they launch.  You might offer the library as the perfect spot to manage a device loan program, as you already loan lots of other things.

Information Initiatives – Is your city/county looking to get the word out about a bond referendum?  Are they looking to recruit citizens to serve on advisory boards or commissions?  You might let them know about a very busy spot in the community where hundreds of residents come every week for trusted information and civic engagement (sound familiar?) and offer that spot as a place for them to directly engage with the people they are trying to reach.

There is some investment here – proactive persistence might be required, staff might need to be redeployed, you might get told “no thanks” many times before you are told “yes please!”  But the pay off is worth it. Here’s why:

When it comes time to consider resource allocation at the city/county/regional level, the decision makers and stakeholders of your internal community of users will understand what you external community  understands – that your public library is a vital and valuable part of each ecosystem that can help it not just survive, but thrive.

Next time, I’ll share some of the ways we’ve been doing this at Chapel Hill Public Library.  I’d like to know if you’ve had success in this area.  Are you working with your local government to achieve a shared goal?  Have you had success in communicating your value to internal stakeholders?  Please share!

 

50 More Shades of Change

“To practice leadership, you need to accept that you are in the business of generating chaos, confusion, and conflict.”

– The Practice of Adaptive Leadership: Tools & Tactics for Changing Your Organization and the World, by Ronald Heifitz et al

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A few weeks ago, I wrote about how people approach change in different ways, according to their preferred “change style.”  Just as there are different approaches to change, there are also different types of change – and it is just as important to understand them.

Technical change can be successfully executed with knowledge, skills, and expertise that already exist within the organization. The problem to be solved is clear, the solution can be provided by an expert, and resolution comes relatively easily. Technical change requires management.

Adaptive change requires an organization to think differently, question the status quo, and, in order to be successfully executed, it often requires a paradigm shift. The problem to be solved is hard to discern, the solution requires new learning and thinking, and that solution cannot be provided by the leader or expert – in order to be lasting, it must come from within the organization.  Adaptive change is not easy. And it is often messy.  Adaptive change requires leadership.

I was introduced to this model of change in a leadership seminar that was built around Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive through the Dangers of Leading by Ronald Heifitz and Marty Linksy.  If you are leading through change, and I believe we all are, I encourage you to check out their work.  For me, it has been incredibly useful as I seek to continually learn and grow as a leader.

Learning to recognize technical and adaptive challenges, and lead accordingly, is essential for success – and sometimes it is hard to tell the difference.

Just after I came on board as Director, I started a process with staff to review and revise our key policies and procedures.  One area we attacked was our fines and fees schedule and borrowing limits. In my mind, this was a technical challenge – we needed to lower our fines, raise our borrowing limits, streamline our fee schedule, and abandon outdated borrowing policies.  No big whup, we’d knock it out in an afternoon meeting.   Continue reading “50 More Shades of Change”

UX is Brand is UX is Brand is UX

We’ve been working with the fantabulous Aaron Schmidt for 9 months now – and we just birthed this baby.  This letter to our users represents a TON of thoughtful conversations, deliberation and iteration, and just plain hard work by our staff here at CHPL.  Couldn’t be prouder of what we are doing with and for the great community we serve.

 

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Dear Chapel Hill,

Every time you interact with us, the experience should be simple, satisfying, and delightful.  Lately, we’ve been making a lot of changes to help meet this goal – whether you walk through the door, visit us on the web, or call us on the phone.

As part of an ongoing user experience improvement project, we moved the magazines upstairs, shifted the holds shelves, interfiled paperbacks, redesigned telephone systems, and much, much more – all in the name of improving your library experience.

Behind the scenes

Not all of the changes have been visible.  Behind the scenes, we’ve been asking ourselves and our community big questions like What is our purpose?  What do we value most?  What promise do we make to our community? Those questions led to great conversations and to new foundational statements that guide all we do and convey the promise that we make to you:

Our Mission           

Sparking Curiosity. Inspiring Learning. Creating Connections.

Our Values

Opportunity, Hospitality, Stewardship.  

Our Service Pledge

You are our top priority.

Fulfilling the promise

So how do we fulfill that promise?  With our collections, services, programs, and spaces.  When you approach the desk or post to our Facebook page.  In our posters, library cards, signs, and more. To help us communicate that promise, we developed a new logo to reflect our new mission.

You’ll start to see the logo in all kinds of places – in the building, in emails like this, and on posters and stickers.  We aren’t throwing out all the old stuff, just phasing in the new look.  We used gift funds to pay for the logo design and we will use gift funds to purchase some giveaway items that feature it.

What’s next?

More improvements.  Later this month, based on what we’ve learned in the user experience improvement project, we will launch a new website and reconfigure some of our stacks and service points.

It might be a little noisy and confusing while we do these things but the end result will make your library experience more simple, satisfying, and delightful. We promise.

Susan Brown
Director

P.S. Here’s a little more about our Mission, Values, and Service Pledge:

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Designing for Dementia (and ALL)

I’m far from a UX expert, but I am learning more and more all the time, thanks in large part to working with Aaron Schmidt over the past year.  Here’s the thing about UX – once you know it, you can’t unknow it.  Once you see it one place, you see it in all the places. Like Mojo Nixon once said of Elvis, “UX is everywhere, man.”

Here’s a recent example:

This week, staff at Chapel Hill Public Library have had training sessions on how to best serve users facing dementia.  Sponsored by Dementia Friendly Orange County, a non-profit whose goal is “to raise awareness and make life better for people with dementia and those who care for them.”  Their new initiative is to train local businesses and organizations about ways to recognize and serve people facing dementia, leading to a “Dementia-Friendly Business” certification.

To help staff understand what’s going on with users facing dementia, the quote that was repeated throughout the session was “They aren’t giving you a hard time.  They are having a hard time.” The trainers stressed that if you find yourself interacting with a user who is facing dementia, remember this to help you empathize, strategize, and ultimately help them.

 

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As soon as I heard this statement, I thought, “If you find yourself interacting with ANY user, remember this to help you empathize, strategize, and ultimately help them.”

Sure, there are a few folks out there whose sole purpose is to give you a hard time.  I’d argue that they are rare.  Most people want to have a successful outcome and genuinely accept help, but they are often having a hard time.  As I’ve learned through working with Mr. Schmidt and garnering some basic UX skills, that hard time is often caused by policies, procedures, places, and spaces that were not designed with the user in mind.

Here are a few more slides from the training about working with folks facing dementia.  I think these are good ideas for working with all the folks:

dementia one

Patience, respect, and dignity for all.  Simplicity in interactions and information.  Yes, please.

dementia two

Helpful attitudes, easy signs, and simple options.  Sign me up.

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Use jargon-free communication?  Monitor body language and tone of voice?  Be patient and flexible?  Let’s do that with all the people, okay?

You can find the training video here and more about the Dementia Friendly Movement here.

#LibraryProblems

You’re probably familiar with the popular site Librarian Problems and the hashtag #librarianprblms.  Lately, I’ve been thinking about LIBRARY problems.  The essential question I’ve been asking when faced with an issue to address, a decision to make, a resource to allocate, or a problem to solve is this:

Are we solving a library problem? Or are we helping solve a community problem?

At CHPL, we’ve had the great good fortune to work with Aaron Schmidt on a year-long LSTA grant to assess and improve the user experience on all fronts. It’s transformative work that will have an impact long after the grant cycle ends.  In one of our earliest workshops with him, he brought up this idea and it has stuck with me.  I can’t even recall the context or the slide from the slide deck, but the message was this – Let’s make sure we are solving a community problem and not a library problem.

library problems

It’s simple, right?  This is the essence of the business we are in, right?  We are problem solvers!  Whether helping a job seeker with a resume, a student finish a project, or making our space available for free tax help, we solve problems for and with our users and communities.

However, sometimes we lose perspective on the problem that needs solving.  Sometimes we get overly invested in solving problems of our own creation and we forget to ask the essential question – “Whose problem is this?”

Here are a few refrains I often hear:

  • “How can we increase program attendance?”
  • “We have to get our circ numbers up.”
  • “How can we get more people to use the databases we pay so much for?”

I think that these are all library problems.  Libraries do something – plan a program, acquire materials, subscribe to databases – and then solve the problems that arise from those things.  The solution to these problems isn’t a better program flyer or more displays or ordering promotional materials from the database vendor.   Continue reading “#LibraryProblems”