Because of UX… (Part 1)

At Chapel Hill Public Library, we had the great good fortune to spend the past 12 months working with Aaron Schmidt on a library-wide UX assessment and improvement project. The project was possible by the State Library of North Carolina, through an LSTA grant.

It was an AMAZING year for me, for CHPL staff, and for our users.  I began the year as an UX noob and a year later, I am far from an UX expert.  But I have learned and grown – professionally and personally – and will continue to do so.

I’ll admit, I wrote the grant as a means to an end – I wanted a new website and a new floor plan for the library, as both were far from optimal experiences for our users.  UX was the way to get there and Aaron Schmidt was the ringer we brought in to get it done.

However, soon after reading his book, meeting him, and delving into the work, I realized that UX was WAY more than a means to an end – it’s the way we ought to do business. Not just CHPL.  Not just public libraries.  All the libraries in all the places should embrace, understand, and utilize UX as part of their core business model.

Why?  There are lots of good reasons, but for me, the biggest one is that libraries are for people.  As I’ve often said…

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UX helps libraries of all types remember what’s most important – the people that use us.  The people that sometimes struggle to use us.  The people that often use us and seldom use us.  The power patrons and the noobs. The people that love us and those that don’t –yet. The people that want to achieve something great – or just complete a simple task.  As I’ve often said…   Continue reading “Because of UX… (Part 1)”

UX is Brand is UX is Brand is UX

We’ve been working with the fantabulous Aaron Schmidt for 9 months now – and we just birthed this baby.  This letter to our users represents a TON of thoughtful conversations, deliberation and iteration, and just plain hard work by our staff here at CHPL.  Couldn’t be prouder of what we are doing with and for the great community we serve.

 

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Dear Chapel Hill,

Every time you interact with us, the experience should be simple, satisfying, and delightful.  Lately, we’ve been making a lot of changes to help meet this goal – whether you walk through the door, visit us on the web, or call us on the phone.

As part of an ongoing user experience improvement project, we moved the magazines upstairs, shifted the holds shelves, interfiled paperbacks, redesigned telephone systems, and much, much more – all in the name of improving your library experience.

Behind the scenes

Not all of the changes have been visible.  Behind the scenes, we’ve been asking ourselves and our community big questions like What is our purpose?  What do we value most?  What promise do we make to our community? Those questions led to great conversations and to new foundational statements that guide all we do and convey the promise that we make to you:

Our Mission           

Sparking Curiosity. Inspiring Learning. Creating Connections.

Our Values

Opportunity, Hospitality, Stewardship.  

Our Service Pledge

You are our top priority.

Fulfilling the promise

So how do we fulfill that promise?  With our collections, services, programs, and spaces.  When you approach the desk or post to our Facebook page.  In our posters, library cards, signs, and more. To help us communicate that promise, we developed a new logo to reflect our new mission.

You’ll start to see the logo in all kinds of places – in the building, in emails like this, and on posters and stickers.  We aren’t throwing out all the old stuff, just phasing in the new look.  We used gift funds to pay for the logo design and we will use gift funds to purchase some giveaway items that feature it.

What’s next?

More improvements.  Later this month, based on what we’ve learned in the user experience improvement project, we will launch a new website and reconfigure some of our stacks and service points.

It might be a little noisy and confusing while we do these things but the end result will make your library experience more simple, satisfying, and delightful. We promise.

Susan Brown
Director

P.S. Here’s a little more about our Mission, Values, and Service Pledge:

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Designing for Dementia (and ALL)

I’m far from a UX expert, but I am learning more and more all the time, thanks in large part to working with Aaron Schmidt over the past year.  Here’s the thing about UX – once you know it, you can’t unknow it.  Once you see it one place, you see it in all the places. Like Mojo Nixon once said of Elvis, “UX is everywhere, man.”

Here’s a recent example:

This week, staff at Chapel Hill Public Library have had training sessions on how to best serve users facing dementia.  Sponsored by Dementia Friendly Orange County, a non-profit whose goal is “to raise awareness and make life better for people with dementia and those who care for them.”  Their new initiative is to train local businesses and organizations about ways to recognize and serve people facing dementia, leading to a “Dementia-Friendly Business” certification.

To help staff understand what’s going on with users facing dementia, the quote that was repeated throughout the session was “They aren’t giving you a hard time.  They are having a hard time.” The trainers stressed that if you find yourself interacting with a user who is facing dementia, remember this to help you empathize, strategize, and ultimately help them.

 

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As soon as I heard this statement, I thought, “If you find yourself interacting with ANY user, remember this to help you empathize, strategize, and ultimately help them.”

Sure, there are a few folks out there whose sole purpose is to give you a hard time.  I’d argue that they are rare.  Most people want to have a successful outcome and genuinely accept help, but they are often having a hard time.  As I’ve learned through working with Mr. Schmidt and garnering some basic UX skills, that hard time is often caused by policies, procedures, places, and spaces that were not designed with the user in mind.

Here are a few more slides from the training about working with folks facing dementia.  I think these are good ideas for working with all the folks:

dementia one

Patience, respect, and dignity for all.  Simplicity in interactions and information.  Yes, please.

dementia two

Helpful attitudes, easy signs, and simple options.  Sign me up.

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Use jargon-free communication?  Monitor body language and tone of voice?  Be patient and flexible?  Let’s do that with all the people, okay?

You can find the training video here and more about the Dementia Friendly Movement here.