On the Subject of Subject Lines

I spend an hour or two every week crafting our weekly e-newsletter – editing content, uploading a few images, and creating links to drive traffic to our website.  I tend to obsess over this piece, endlessly proofreading for errors and triple-checking links.  Until recently, however, I had not paid nearly enough attention to one of the most important parts of this or any e-newsletter – the subject line.  Continue reading “On the Subject of Subject Lines”

Minute to Market It #3 – Feed Your News Feed

A series of short and sweet marketing tips you can implement right now.

M2MI #3: Feed Your News Feed

On Facebook, it’s really easy to be focused on your wall and forget about your news feed.  But remember, your wall is pretty much focused on you – your profile pictures, your timeline, your posts for the day, your admin panel that tells you lots of cool info about your page and how its doing. All important stuff, but not the only area to focus on.  Your news feed is focused on everyone else – it shows you what everyone you follow on FB is talking about.  Start listening to them.  Start talking to them.  Start *engaging* them.  Continue reading “Minute to Market It #3 – Feed Your News Feed”

Putt-ing the Fun in Library Fundraiser

As with many public libraries these days, Lawrence Public Library is not a quiet place with shushing librarians and silent stacks. But for one weekend every year, things get really crazy with the Lawrence Public Library Foundation’s Caddy Stacks Mini Golf Fundraiser. Last weekend, the sounds of golf balls bouncing off bookends and families laughing together filled the library – and the cash register drawer was ringing, too!

Caddy Stacks was organized by Kathleen Morgan, the amazing Executive Director of the Lawrence Public Library Foundation (this is the same brain behind the Stack of Stories) and her equally amazing crew of volunteers. The idea is simple in its insanity ingenuity: For one weekend a year, there is a community-built, 18-hole mini golf course winding its way through the library both during and after regular hours of operation.  Continue reading “Putt-ing the Fun in Library Fundraiser”

Three Reasons to Love World Book Night

It’s 11:00 pm on Monday night.  This time last week, I was cruising the main drag in town with two colleagues, passing out copies of Ender’s Game, chatting up folks of all stripes, and hoisting a pint with many of them.  World Book Night USA was a great night to be a librarian – especially one whose passions are readers’ services and marketing.  And beer.   Continue reading “Three Reasons to Love World Book Night”

Got Marketing? Bubble Room Blogger Answers Six Questions

At PLA this year, I had the great good fortune to share a cuppa in the hotel lobby with Alison Circle.  She is the Director of Marketing & Strategic Planning at Columbus Metropolitan Library in Ohio and she blogs for Library Journal’s Bubble Room blog.

Her marketing experience is impressive as is her work at CML and with the new Lead the Change series.  However, upon meeting her, what’s most impressive is her warmth, her enthusiasm, and her generosity.  She agreed to virtually “sit” for the 658.8 interview this week:     Continue reading “Got Marketing? Bubble Room Blogger Answers Six Questions”

Top Five Take Aways from PLA

PLA 2012 in Philly was a great one – a conference that revealed the hard work and innovative thinking of librarians around the country and the world.  It’s taken me a week to recover!  I went to a great preconference, saw some amazing new products on the exhibit floor, went to some inspiring sessions, and networked with some folks who I only knew by name and reputation and now consider contacts and colleagues.

Stay tuned in the next week or so for some more in-depth articles about #PLA12, but in the meantime, here are the top five things that I am bringing back home to my library to guide my actions and keep in the forefront of my thoughts: Continue reading “Top Five Take Aways from PLA”

Six Questions with Kasey Riley

Introducing the 658.8 interview – six questions with public library marketers.  This occasional series is meant to be fun for the interviewee and informative for the reader.  Kasey Riley kicks it off!

Kasey is Communications Manager at Johnson County Library, where she was part of the team behind this brilliant campaign.   I was fortunate enough to attend her “Marketing at the Point of Contact” workshop with a colleague, who wrote a nice recap over on her blog. 

Kasey is full of energy, ideas, and the willingness to share both with her colleagues and peers.  She generously agreed to answer six questions from 658.8: Continue reading “Six Questions with Kasey Riley”

Taking the Temperature of a Capital Campaign

Fundraising thermometers are almost always presented literally as thermometers, often painted on sturdy plywood and posted at a busy intersection or campus gateway.  When a fundraising milestone is met, the thermometer is filled up to that point, a process that is repeated until the campaign is complete and the thermometer is full.  These thermometers are de rigeur aspects of a campaign – necessary but rarely engaging tools.

When the Lawrence Public Library Foundation embarked on its “New Stories” capital campaign to raise a million dollars last year, they knew they needed a thermometer to show the community how the campaign was progressing.  They also knew that they wanted the thermometer to do more than measure – they wanted it to engage and excite the community and somehow reflect the nature of the campaign.  What they ended up with was the “Stack of Stories.” Continue reading “Taking the Temperature of a Capital Campaign”

One Hour, Three Libraries, Nine Words

  • Intuit.  Inquire.  Identify.
  • Claim Your Seat.
  • Always Be Connecting.

In the excellent Building a Library Aware Community webinar, three libraries talked about how they successfully articulate their value to their communities.  My notes are copious, but in reviewing them, I noticed that each panelist offered up a three-word phrase that expressed the essence of their project and their perspective. Continue reading “One Hour, Three Libraries, Nine Words”